Edgewood Avenue Bridge

The Edgewood Avenue Bridge has been demolished and is being rebuilt over the Eastside Trail extension.
Photo Credit: Christopher Martin

Get Atlanta BeltLine updates right in your inbox!
Get Atlanta BeltLine updates right in your inbox!
 

MAP

Click to Expand
Interactive Map
Events  //   Blog  //   News  //   FAQs  //   Contact

The Atlanta BeltLine

Where Atlanta Comes Together. Learn more

 
 
Foundational Studies

The Nuts and Bolts of the Atlanta BeltLine Vision

The Atlanta BeltLine has come a long way since Ryan Gravel first presented the idea in his 1999 master’s thesis. Along the way, there have been numerous studies, designs, work plans, revisions, and updates. Several core documents serve as the framework for what the Atlanta BeltLine has become, and what it will grow to be. Please view the grid below the descriptions to download full documents.

2030 Strategic Implementation Plan

On December 11, 2013, ABI’s Board of Directors unanimously approved the Atlanta Beltline 2030 Strategic Implementation Plan (SIP), which will guide the citywide transportation and redevelopment program through its completion. The SIP is the culmination of a yearlong effort with extensive community and stakeholder engagement to create a living document that determines short, medium and long-term priorities for the implementation of the Atlanta BeltLine across the City of Atlanta. The SIP also provides cost estimates and funding scenarios to complete the program.

Locally Preferred Alternatives

The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) conducted an Alternatives Analysis (AA) to identify and evaluate transit improvements within the Atlanta BeltLine corridor. Finalized in 2007, this offered options for improving local and regional mobility, accessibility, and connectivity, while also supporting the City of Atlanta’s redevelopment plans.

Five-Year Work Plan

The implementation of the Atlanta BeltLine began in 2006 with the formation of Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. (ABI) and the start of the Five-Year Work Plan. This plan served as a road map for all targeted activities and accomplishments of the first five years for ABI and its partners. The majority of the goals articulated in the plan were achieved in the five-year timeframe.

Atlanta BeltLine Redevelopment Plan

Completed in 2005, the Atlanta BeltLine Redevelopment Plan includes the initial proposal to combine greenspace, trails, transit, and new development along 22 miles of historic rail segments that encircle Atlanta’s urban core. The plan provided a framework for moving the project forward by outlining the major public infrastructure projects that comprise the project, identifying the type and scope of development that would be consistent with good planning practices, and by determining the boundaries of a Tax Allocation District to successfully provide a primary local funding source for the project.

Environmental Justice Policy

The Environmental Justice Policy explains the Atlanta BeltLine’s commitment to the fair treatment of people of all races, age, cultures and incomes; and how they shall all be fully considered during the Atlanta BeltLine’s planning, decision-making, development and implementation of programs, policies, and activities.

Emerald Necklace Study

In 2004, Alex Garvin published “The BeltLine Emerald Necklace: Atlanta’s New Public Realm” outlining a public realm framework around which 21st Century Atlanta can grow and prosper.  Recognizing the extraordinary opportunity offered by the Atlanta BeltLine project, Garvin’s team looked for ways to maximize greenspace opportunities in the Atlanta BeltLine corridor. The study was integral to the plans for comprehensive development or redevelopment of hundreds of acres for greenspace improvements.

Ryan Gravel’s Thesis

Ryan Gravel’s joint master’s thesis in Architecture and City Planning from Georgia Tech in 1999 was the original vision for the ambitious Atlanta BeltLine project. Gravel’s subsequent work as a volunteer for the Atlanta BeltLine initiative was critical to obtain the necessary support and funding to get the project from drawing board to reality.

Ryan Gravel’s Thesis Addendum

An addendum to Ryan Gravel’s joint master’s thesis in Architecture and City Planning was published in 2005.


These documents can all be downloaded as PDFs. The Atlanta BeltLine Redevelopment Plan is approximately 90 pages, so please plan for large files sizes.

DocumentDescription
Atlanta BeltLine 2013 Strategic Implementation PlanIn December 2013, ABI adopted the 2030 Strategic Implementation Plan (SIP), which will guide the citywide transportation and redevelopment program through its completion.
Atlanta BeltLine Redevelopment PlanThe Atlanta BeltLine's initial redevelopment proposal to combine greenspace, trails, transit, and new development along 22 miles of historic rail segments that encircle Atlanta's urban core.
Emerald Necklace StudyIn 2004, Alex Garvin published "The BeltLine Emerald Necklace: Atlanta's New Public Realm" outlining a public realm framework around which 21st Century Atlanta will grow and prosper.
Environmental Justice PolicyThe Environmental Justice Policy explains the Atlanta BeltLine's commitment to the fair treatment of people of all races, age, cultures and incomes; and how they shall all be fully considered during the Atlanta BeltLine’s planning, decision-making, development and implementation of programs, policies, and activities.
Five-Year Work PlanThis plan served as a road map for all targeted activities and accomplishments of the first five years for ABI and its partners. The majority of the goals articulated in the plan were achieved in the five-year timeframe.
Locally Preferred AlternativesThe Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) conducted an Alternatives Analysis (AA) to identify and evaluate transit improvements within the Atlanta BeltLine corridor.
Ryan Gravel ThesisRyan Gravel’s joint master’s thesis in Architecture and City Planning from Georgia Tech in 1999 was the original vision for the ambitious Atlanta BeltLine.
Ryan Gravel Thesis AddendumAn addendum to Ryan Gravel’s joint master’s thesis in Architecture and City Planning was published in 2005.